Book Review: “Sex Ed for Everyone”

Above: A free sample panel from the “Sex Ed for Everyone”
comic by Sophie LaBelle. Click to enlarge.

Sophie LaBelle, best known as the artist behind Assigned Male Comics, recently came out with a new comic book entitled “Sex Ed For Everyone.” Featuring many of the same characters as her regular Assigned Male series, “Sex Ed for Everyone” is aimed at teenagers who are dissatisfied with the scope of sex education they are receiving in school.

It’s important to note that “Sex Ed for Everyone” is not a substitute for comprehensive sex education. Pregnancy is not covered, so you will not find adorable cartoon depictions of prenatal development (I know, I was disappointed too). There’s also not much in the way of contraceptive knowledge or STI prevention, beyond a brief mention of male and female condoms.

But it was clearly never LaBelle’s intent to be a one-stop shop for sexual health information. Instead, “Sex Ed for Everyone” is best thought of as a supplement to sex education, particularly on matters of sexual identity, sexual orientation, and gender expression.

Judged on that metric, the book does an admirable job. To give you a sense of its tone, here are a few points I particularly appreciated:

  • “I think it’s a shame that we don’t hear much about the variety of bodies out there. It’s one thing to tell us that the majority of people aren’t trans, intersex, or disabled. It’s another to tell us that we don’t need to learn about them.”
  • Speaking about queer teens making the decision not to have sex, one character notes: “The need for belonging might pressure people into situations they don’t actually want.”
  • And then there’s this fantastic dialogue: “I’m scared to get pressured into having sex. When do you know you’re ready?” “It’s true that it can feel overwhelming, but it’s totally OK to take your time. Maybe you’ll never ‘be ready’ and that’s also fine.”
These messages are especially important for LaBelle’s trans and queer audience, because sexual minority youth are actually more likely to have an unplanned pregnancy than their cis, straight peers. That might seem like a paradox, but when you consider the cultural pressure that some lesbians and bisexuals are under to “appear straight,” the risk of reluctant sexual intercourse is apparent. In fact, when I was a student at the University of Miami, our pro-life student group hosted a speaker who had been in that very situation — twice. (Her first pregnancy tragically ended in abortion after she received deceptive counseling; for her second, she chose life.)
“Sex Ed for Everyone” is available on Etsy.

Book Review: “Sex Ed for Everyone”

Above: A free sample panel from the “Sex Ed for Everyone”
comic by Sophie LaBelle. Click to enlarge.

Sophie LaBelle, best known as the artist behind Assigned Male Comics, recently came out with a new comic book entitled “Sex Ed For Everyone.” Featuring many of the same characters as her regular Assigned Male series, “Sex Ed for Everyone” is aimed at teenagers who are dissatisfied with the scope of sex education they are receiving in school.

It’s important to note that “Sex Ed for Everyone” is not a substitute for comprehensive sex education. Pregnancy is not covered, so you will not find adorable cartoon depictions of prenatal development (I know, I was disappointed too). There’s also not much in the way of contraceptive knowledge or STI prevention, beyond a brief mention of male and female condoms.

But it was clearly never LaBelle’s intent to be a one-stop shop for sexual health information. Instead, “Sex Ed for Everyone” is best thought of as a supplement to sex education, particularly on matters of sexual identity, sexual orientation, and gender expression.

Judged on that metric, the book does an admirable job. To give you a sense of its tone, here are a few points I particularly appreciated:

  • “I think it’s a shame that we don’t hear much about the variety of bodies out there. It’s one thing to tell us that the majority of people aren’t trans, intersex, or disabled. It’s another to tell us that we don’t need to learn about them.”
  • Speaking about queer teens making the decision not to have sex, one character notes: “The need for belonging might pressure people into situations they don’t actually want.”
  • And then there’s this fantastic dialogue: “I’m scared to get pressured into having sex. When do you know you’re ready?” “It’s true that it can feel overwhelming, but it’s totally OK to take your time. Maybe you’ll never ‘be ready’ and that’s also fine.”
These messages are especially important for LaBelle’s trans and queer audience, because sexual minority youth are actually more likely to have an unplanned pregnancy than their cis, straight peers. That might seem like a paradox, but when you consider the cultural pressure that some lesbians and bisexuals are under to “appear straight,” the risk of reluctant sexual intercourse is apparent. In fact, when I was a student at the University of Miami, our pro-life student group hosted a speaker who had been in that very situation — twice. (Her first pregnancy tragically ended in abortion after she received deceptive counseling; for her second, she chose life.)
“Sex Ed for Everyone” is available on Etsy.

PLAGAL at the Pro-Life Women’s Conference

[Today’s guest post by Sarah Anne first appeared in a newsletter for the Pro-Life Alliance of Gays and Lesbians (PLAGAL) and is reprinted with permission.]

June 24, 25th, and 26th of 2016, the first annual Pro-Life Women’s Conference was held in Dallas, Texas. The conference was the vision of Abby Johnson, former Planned Parenthood director, now pro-life and an advocate for abortion workers. Her organization, And Then There Were None, helps provider abortion clinic workers with a way out, and financial, legal, emotional, and spiritual support as they leave the industry. The three-day conference’s goal was to provide women with a place to come together and help reclaim the narrative of what empowerment, justice, equality, and even feminism can do to support the pro-life position, and women in unplanned pregnancies.

The conference buzzed with excitement the entire weekend and women with many different stories and experiences shared the ways they are helping out in the movement. Feminism, advocacy (both on the sidewalk and digitally), religious, secular, and even a Spanish language series of presentations were available throughout the weekend. Many who attended the conference were from Texas, but there were a decent amount of representatives from pregnancy centers and organizations across the United States. I got to attend the conference thanks to the generosity of PLAGAL members and I helped educate and inform people attending the conference about our organization at the table we set up. From the website for PLAGAL:

PLAGAL strives to promote a respect for life within the gay community and encourage gay and lesbian participation [in] the pro-life cause. Membership includes women and men of various sexual orientations, political affiliations, and geographic locations — all committed to raising awareness of the pro-life ethic as consistent with the gay and lesbian struggle for human rights.

I wasn’t sure what to expect from the atendees as we set up the PLAGAL table in the Marsalis Hall. Would there be shock or hostility? Curiosity or dismissal? What I realized about the weekend after I hugged my friends goodbye was the following:

  1. We were well received. People were genuinely curious about our organization’s existence and after only having talked with them briefly about who we are, they eagerly took a brochure and expressed that they were happy we were there. 
  2. We are desperately needed. As great as it is to have twenty pro-life Christian organizations represented and out helping the cause, we fill a gap that those organizations just can’t. We say, regardless of your religion or sexual identity/orientation, you are welcome to stand with us (not saying some religious groups would not be welcoming). However you are, whoever you are, if you are for mothers and babies, you belong here. This is the type of unity that gets BIG things done, and frankly, the pro-life side seriously needs to embrace this message. We are the messengers and voices for those who might otherwise feel less than welcome. 
  3. We still have a ways to go. I hate to say it, but the conference was lacking racial and ethnic diversity. Obviously there were some Latina women present for the Spanish presentations and conference overall, but there were only a few black women present. I saw maybe one Asian girl, and I don’t know if anyone besides atheists and Christians were represented as far as religions go. [Editor’s note: Secular Pro-Life had a pagan volunteer.] While I realize our main goal is to stop abortion, I can’t help but wonder where the women from these backgrounds are, and why aren’t they coming to this conference? How can we help them more as fellow advocates? 
  4. I thought most people who were gay are liberal and support abortion. Why do we even exist? Similar queries were often posed by people who walked by our table and stopped to talk and take a brochure. Who we are, why we exist as a group, and why we are an essential part of the pro-life movement, are sometimes things that don’t come across a computer screen. As a representative of PLAGAL, I tried to express the importance of solidarity, camaraderie, and openness to working with people who are different to the people who came to talk to us. I tried to say, with my words and my heart, that we need to work together, embrace new ideas, and respond with love to not only pregnant women in crisis, but to those who want to take up the mantle of the cause. 
  5. We need YOU. You may have been hurt before in the past by an organization not wanting to accept you as a volunteer or feeling like you couldn’t be involved in some way. Please don’t let that stop you from trying again. Use your gifts! Your talent, passion, and caring spirit are what we need to reach everyone! “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.” -Theodore Roosevelt. 
The 2017 Pro-life Women’s Conference will be held in Orlando, Florida on June 23-25. Check out their Facebook page for more information regarding the conference and hotel selection.

PLAGAL at the Pro-Life Women’s Conference

[Today’s guest post by Sarah Anne first appeared in a newsletter for the Pro-Life Alliance of Gays and Lesbians (PLAGAL) and is reprinted with permission.]

June 24, 25th, and 26th of 2016, the first annual Pro-Life Women’s Conference was held in Dallas, Texas. The conference was the vision of Abby Johnson, former Planned Parenthood director, now pro-life and an advocate for abortion workers. Her organization, And Then There Were None, helps provider abortion clinic workers with a way out, and financial, legal, emotional, and spiritual support as they leave the industry. The three-day conference’s goal was to provide women with a place to come together and help reclaim the narrative of what empowerment, justice, equality, and even feminism can do to support the pro-life position, and women in unplanned pregnancies.

The conference buzzed with excitement the entire weekend and women with many different stories and experiences shared the ways they are helping out in the movement. Feminism, advocacy (both on the sidewalk and digitally), religious, secular, and even a Spanish language series of presentations were available throughout the weekend. Many who attended the conference were from Texas, but there were a decent amount of representatives from pregnancy centers and organizations across the United States. I got to attend the conference thanks to the generosity of PLAGAL members and I helped educate and inform people attending the conference about our organization at the table we set up. From the website for PLAGAL:

PLAGAL strives to promote a respect for life within the gay community and encourage gay and lesbian participation [in] the pro-life cause. Membership includes women and men of various sexual orientations, political affiliations, and geographic locations — all committed to raising awareness of the pro-life ethic as consistent with the gay and lesbian struggle for human rights.

I wasn’t sure what to expect from the atendees as we set up the PLAGAL table in the Marsalis Hall. Would there be shock or hostility? Curiosity or dismissal? What I realized about the weekend after I hugged my friends goodbye was the following:

  1. We were well received. People were genuinely curious about our organization’s existence and after only having talked with them briefly about who we are, they eagerly took a brochure and expressed that they were happy we were there. 
  2. We are desperately needed. As great as it is to have twenty pro-life Christian organizations represented and out helping the cause, we fill a gap that those organizations just can’t. We say, regardless of your religion or sexual identity/orientation, you are welcome to stand with us (not saying some religious groups would not be welcoming). However you are, whoever you are, if you are for mothers and babies, you belong here. This is the type of unity that gets BIG things done, and frankly, the pro-life side seriously needs to embrace this message. We are the messengers and voices for those who might otherwise feel less than welcome. 
  3. We still have a ways to go. I hate to say it, but the conference was lacking racial and ethnic diversity. Obviously there were some Latina women present for the Spanish presentations and conference overall, but there were only a few black women present. I saw maybe one Asian girl, and I don’t know if anyone besides atheists and Christians were represented as far as religions go. [Editor’s note: Secular Pro-Life had a pagan volunteer.] While I realize our main goal is to stop abortion, I can’t help but wonder where the women from these backgrounds are, and why aren’t they coming to this conference? How can we help them more as fellow advocates? 
  4. I thought most people who were gay are liberal and support abortion. Why do we even exist? Similar queries were often posed by people who walked by our table and stopped to talk and take a brochure. Who we are, why we exist as a group, and why we are an essential part of the pro-life movement, are sometimes things that don’t come across a computer screen. As a representative of PLAGAL, I tried to express the importance of solidarity, camaraderie, and openness to working with people who are different to the people who came to talk to us. I tried to say, with my words and my heart, that we need to work together, embrace new ideas, and respond with love to not only pregnant women in crisis, but to those who want to take up the mantle of the cause. 
  5. We need YOU. You may have been hurt before in the past by an organization not wanting to accept you as a volunteer or feeling like you couldn’t be involved in some way. Please don’t let that stop you from trying again. Use your gifts! Your talent, passion, and caring spirit are what we need to reach everyone! “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.” -Theodore Roosevelt. 
The 2017 Pro-life Women’s Conference will be held in Orlando, Florida on June 23-25. Check out their Facebook page for more information regarding the conference and hotel selection.

7 things pro-lifers wish our pro-choice friends understood about us.

Recently my FB newsfeed delivered
me this gem: “5 Thing Pro-Choicers Wish Their
Anti-Choice Friends Understood
.”
To my disappointment, the article includes plenty of sarcasm, negative
assumptions, and (in my experience) incorrect stereotypes. It certainly doesn’t
come off as a conversation between friends, so maybe the title was just
tongue-in-cheek.
But I really do have pro-choice
friends. Family too. I get along with them well, for the most part. And I
appreciate when we have opportunities to explore each other’s perspectives in a
non-combative way. To that end, I wrote this article as if I were discussing
these issues with friends. I know there are plenty of people who feel more
comfortable with the cartoon villain versions of their ideological opponents…
Pictured: Pro-lifers?
…but if you recognize that life
is more shades of gray than black and white, this post is for you. (As Timothy Brahm said, “There are no Snidely Whiplashes…”)
*****
1.
We’re
so much more than a bunch of old straight religious
white Republican men.
I actually think that anyone who
is (a) intellectually honest and (b) paying enough attention probably already
realizes this, so I am going to go through these misconceptions kind of quickly
and move on to the less known issues.
1a.
We’re not all old.

The younger generations are traditionally more left-leaning, and as we increasingly enter
the political sphere the effects are obvious. But despite liberalizing trends
in national opinion on other issues (gay marriage, women in combat, drug legalization), there’s been no equivalent
swing to the pro-choice view on abortion. In fact, polls show that the youngest
generation is at
least as anti-abortion
, if not more so, than previous generations.  
See also:
1b.
We’re not all straight.

To be fair, this is something I seem to have to remind certain segments of the
pro-life movement about as much as my pro-choice friends. It’s more difficult
to find polling data on this, so instead I will point again to The Pro-Life Alliance of Gays and
Lesbians
. You
can also read more about the experiences of pro-life activists who are LGBT
here: “How does the pro-life movement
look to LGBT pro-lifers?

“Human rights start when human life begins.”

See also:
1c.
We’re not all religious.
a. Depending on polls, between
one sixth and one fifth of nonreligious Americans are anti-abortion. (See “Are you One of Six Million?”)
b. The non-religious pro-lifer
isn’t a “fake” secularist either. Atheist apologist Christopher Hitchens himself argued on behalf of the
unborn child.
c. The U.S. is becoming less
religious all the time; in particular, the youngest generation identifies less
with religion than generations before us. Yet national anti-abortion sentiment
remains largely unchanged—for every generation.
See also:
1d.
We’re not all white.

Polls show 51% of African Americans and 61%
of Hispanic Americans think abortion is morally wrong. And a range of 30% to 40%
of African Americans as well as 50% of Hispanic Americans think abortion should
generally be illegal. A multivariate analysis of answers about abortion from
the General Social Survey going back four decades found that black men and
women have consistently been less accepting of abortion than white men and
women.
Many people on both sides of the debate are aware of the
disproportionate rates of abortion for African American and Latino communities.
It’s important to recognize this disproportion isn’t something people of color
readily accept. Many people within these communities are anti-abortion.

 
See also:
1e.
We’re not all Republican.
  Nearly a third of Democrats and a fourth of
people who describe themselves as “liberal” also describe themselves as
“pro-life.”

Similarly, nearly a third of Democrats say abortion should generally be illegal.
Historically the pro-life
movement was actually quite progressive, and the Democratic Party was
more accepting of pro-lifers in its ranks. Unfortunately, now being pro-choice
seems to be a litmus test of a “true” Democrat. It makes sense to me that the
same groups who insist all pro-lifers are Republicans insist any
self-identifying pro-life Democrat isn’t a “real” Democrat, regardless of how
many leftist positions the person holds. But wishing the stereotype-defying
pro-lifers will disappear won’t make it so.


See Also:
1f.
We’re not all men.

Not even close, actually. Of all the demographic stereotypes pushed on the
pro-life movement, I think the gender narrative is the most strident and
possibly most dishonest.
Even if the ratios aren’t 1:1,
there are real correlations between being pro-life and right-wing or being
pro-life and religious. And given the strong correlation between being LGBT and
being a left-winger, there’s probably a real correlation between being pro-life
and straight. And while the data isn’t there to support the “old” and “white”
stereotypes, people don’t harp on those factors nearly as often as they repeat
the gender myth.
The “anti-choice war on women”
narrative is ubiquitous: out-of-touch, controlling, misogynistic men are the
driving force of the pro-life movement, and any woman who doesn’t hate herself
is pro-choice. By now the idea is conventional wisdom. It’s also total
nonsense.
According to Gallup, once you account for the margin
of error, women are just as likely as men to think abortion should be illegal
all or most of the time. Moreover, there are significantly more women who think
abortion should generally be illegal than there are those who think it should generally
be legal.
And this trend is reflected in
the makeup of the pro-life movement. Despite the endlessly echoed (and uncited)
claim that “77% of anti-abortion leaders are men,” much of our movement is led by women.
I think it’s possible for
intellectually honest people who just aren’t that involved in the abortion
debate to miss the pro-life secularists, LGBT people, and other non-traditional
pro-lifers. But a person would have to really not be paying attention to
genuinely believe the pro-life woman is an anomaly.

(Click to enlarge.)
See also:
*****
2. We’re not anti-woman. This accusation actually comes in two forms.
2a.
Anti-woman motivations.
The
first and more common form is that pro-lifers are against abortion because we don’t respect or like women.
That is, our misogyny motivates us to try to control women’s bodies, choices,
and lives.
I think this idea comes about largely
because many pro-choicers assume the fetus is not a morally relevant human
being, and, importantly, they further assume pro-lifers secretly or
subconsciously agree with this view. If that’s the case, our anti-abortion
efforts can’t truly be motivated by concern for human lives; there must be some
other, more sinister reason we’re making such a big deal about abortion. It
must be because we’re misogynists, and we talk about human rights only as a
cover for our disdain.
But this perspective doesn’t
explain why abortion views don’t divide along gender lines or why there are so
many female pro-life activists, including pro-life leaders (see point #1f). And
it definitely doesn’t explain the existence of feminist pro-lifers—by that I
mean people who share traditionally feminist goals outside of abortion on
demand. For example there are plenty of pro-lifers who care about fighting rape culture, decreasing gender stereotypes, increasing support for pregnant women (and parents and families in
general), and generally fighting prejudice based on gender, sexuality, and race. You can be for all of those
goals and also against abortion. I am.
And, most of the time, when I
develop friendships of some depth with people who are pro-choice, they
recognize my passion for gender issues and my embrace of the feminist label,
and they see that my anti-abortion stance is based on reasoning quite separate
from any anti-woman sentiment. This is one of the reasons I think it’s so good
for us to have friends who think differently than we do: friendship destroys
prejudice. We’ve seen this when it comes to race and sexuality, and I think it
can also be true for politics. Some of my pro-choice friends have told me they
think differently about pro-lifers just for having known me, and I feel the
same way about them.
I’m not pretending there’s no
such thing as a misogynist pro-lifer. Misogyny is a real problem, and I believe
some pro-lifers are misogynists because some people are misogynists (and a lot
of people are pro-life). But I don’t think the two views are as correlated as
our opposition likes to insist. In fact, I suspect the more you get to know
pro-lifers, the more you’ll see how much many of us care (see point #7) and the
less you’ll believe we all just hate women.

Meet Destiny.
2b.
Anti-woman effects.

The second form of the anti-woman accusation is sort of a fall back from the
first. When face-to-face with pro-lifers who clearly do care about women, some
pro-choicers will say that, while we may not have specifically anti-woman motivations, it doesn’t matter because
our goal of restricting abortion will have anti-woman effects.
First, this makes the
“anti-woman” accusation pretty misleading. We generally accuse people of being
“anti-[whatever group]” based on their motivations, not their effects.
Conflating motivation and effect is the tactic used to accuse pro-woman
policies of being “anti-man,” religious diversity policies of being
“anti-Christian,” or affirmative action policies of being “anti-white.” This
tactic ignores the positive, affirmative reasons people might hold a position
and insists such people, by definition, are “anti-[whatever group],” regardless
of their actual motivations or feelings on the subject. So I think this version
of the “anti-woman” accusation is pretty disingenuous.
Second, it’s not at all clear
that abortion restrictions are anti-woman while fully embracing abortion is
pro-woman. Many of us believe unrestricted abortion is the excuse society uses to not support pregnant and
parenting women and the excuse certain kinds of men
use

to guiltlessly skip out on unplanned fatherhood. “Choice” doesn’t have such a
nice connotation when it comes in the form of “well it was your choice to have
the baby, so you deal with it.” Feminists against abortion, including some of our country’s
most prominent feminist
foremothers
,
have long called attention to how abortion can exploit women.
Beyond that, abortion is so
heavily politicized that some don’t want to admit there’s any negative aspect or moral complexity to it, lest they give credence
to the pro-life view. But this means realities like fetal development or the link
between abortion and pre-term birth
are glossed over, leaving women
without information they may have wished they had. It means increasing insistence that there’s nothing to regret
or feel shame over, alienating and dismissing the
women

who do struggle with those feelings. It means downplaying how abortion is used
to cover up sex trafficking. It also means horrors like
Kermit Gosnell’s clinic—in which both a
woman and already-born children were killed
—can fester in the vacuum of any real oversight and, when they are discovered,
can go largely unnoticed in the vacuum of media coverage.
I’m not saying the average
pro-choice person is aware of or accepts all of these problems. I don’t think
that’s true. But I am saying that if being “anti-woman” is about effects, not
motivation, than our country’s relatively liberal embrace of abortion can be quite
anti-woman.
The “War on Women” rhetoric would
have you believe abortion is unquestionably at the heart of women’s liberation
and therefore anyone against abortion is against women. But in reality abortion’s
effects on women are more complicated than that—so much so that, even independent
of the question of fetal value, people who care about women can have compelling
reasons to come down on either side of the abortion debate.
See Also: 
*****
3.
We’re pro-contraception.
I can understand why people would
get the impression that if I am anti-abortion I must be anti-contraception.
There are plenty of pro-life organizations and leaders who are openly
anti-contraception, and if you aren’t very involved in a given political
movement, it’s easy to assume after a cursory glance that the most prominent activists
represent the majority of the movement.
But in this case you’d be mistaken.
Polls suggest a
minimum of 78% of pro-lifers find
contraception morally acceptable. And
it’s not just that we think it’s alright in theory; we think so in practice,
too.
Research suggests the strong majority (over 80%) of
sexually active American women use some form of artificial contraception. Note
that, if 
about half of American women are pro-life, this means the
majority of self-described sexually active pro-life women use artificial
contraception.
(Pro-choice author Will Saletan
over at Slate has a great post explaining why the data suggests
pro-lifers are not anti-contraception.)
Certainly SPL takes a
pro-contraception stance. If you’re interested, you can read more about why here.
See also:
*****
4. We like sex.
4a.
The “anti-sex” accusation stems mostly from our different views of fetal life,
not our different views of sex.
There are a lot of different
reasons people are pro-choice.  I think
most pro-choicers empathize with the very difficult position an unplanned
pregnancy can put a woman in, and many are concerned about protecting bodily
rights.
But it also seems some people
advocate for abortion primarily based on sex. That is, they think people ought
to be able to have sex lives unhindered by potential procreation. Such an
abortion advocate might describe this idea in terms of sexual liberation and
gender equality, but for many on our side of the fence, it doesn’t sound so
noble. For those of us who view the fetus as a morally relevant human being,
advocating fetal destruction in the name of sexual liberation sounds supremely…backwards.
 It sounds like valuing an active,
enjoyable sex life over not killing people.
But of course that’s not how most
abortion advocates see it. In my experience, most of the “sexual liberation”
pro-choicers don’t see the fetus as a human being, or at least not a morally
relevant one. So it’s not about advocating an active sex life over actual human
lives. It’s about valuing sexual freedom over nebulous, irrelevant “clumps of
cells.” If I thought that’s all abortion involved, I would feel similarly.
In other words, our views differ more
based on how we think of fetal life than how we think of sex.
It’s important for pro-lifers to
understand this, rather than hurl accusations of selfish, sexual promiscuity at
the other side. It’s likewise important for pro-choicers to see this, rather than
accuse us of simply hating sex. Saying people should make sexual decisions such
that they’re not in a position to want an abortion doesn’t mean we hate sex any
more than saying people shouldn’t drink and drive means we hate driving. Drive
as much as you like. But do so safely and, above all, please don’t kill anyone.
4b.
Different views of sex are still a factor, but not as big of one as people
think.
I think most of the anti-sex
accusation comes down to different views of fetal life, but not all of it. Religious
people are more likely than non-religious people to be pro-life, and plenty of
religious people are more likely to speak out against sex outside of marriage.
I think there’s a decent argument to be made that “anti-premarital-sex,” or the broader “anti-reckless-sex,” are not equivalent to “anti-sex.” Plenty of people
who think it’s better to wait until marriage have active, enjoyable sex lives
with their spouses and like sex quite a lot. But I think the more compelling
point is that most pro-lifers don’t actually wait until marriage to have sex.
How do I know this? First and
foremost, because the vast majority of people in general have
premarital sex, and pro-lifers are about half of the country. So there’s that
math. Besides that, the pro-life movement doesn’t fit the 1:1 correlation to
conservative Christians that so many people expect (see point #1). We like sex,
we have sex outside of marriage, we have sex using contraception (point #2), and
we still think it’s wrong to kill fetuses.
See also:
*****
5. We experience unplanned pregnancies too…
…but no, that doesn’t
automatically mean we turn pro-choice.
Some
pro-choicers seem to think we are only anti-abortion because we just don’t
understand how frightening and life-changing an unplanned pregnancy can be, and
that if we were to be put in that difficult position, we’d choose abortion too.
And,
interestingly, is isn’t just pro-choicers who make this assumption. Some
anti-contraception pro-lifers seem to think that anyone who has sex while using
contraception (which,
as shown in point #3, would include most pro-lifers) isn’t
“open to life” and thus will choose abortion if they accidentally procreate.
But it’s not the
case. According to the CDC, about 
37%
of births result from unplanned conceptions
. In 2012 there were about
3.9 million
 births, meaning over 1.4 million women carried
unplanned pregnancies to term. 
That’s not to say every self-described pro-life woman always
chooses life. It’s true, of course, that some pro-life women do
rescind their
views
and get an abortion. But it’s also true that plenty of women stand by their convictions, carrying out
crisis pregnancies
even when (from a pro-choice perspective) abortion may have
been much simpler. Insisting we’re all one unplanned pregnancy away from being
pro-choice not only implies none of us are sincere in our beliefs, but also
demeans or outright ignores the courage, sacrifice, and love with which so many
mothers have carried and birthed their unplanned children. In that sense,
frankly, I think it’s a pretty anti-woman thing to say.



Claudia and her “crisis pregnancy,” Taylor.

And meanwhile pointing out inconsistency isn’t as meaningful as
so many people suggest, mostly because it goes both ways. Just as some women
switch to the pro-choice side in the face of an intimidating pregnancy, some
women switch to the pro-life side
when
they experience a planned pregnancy
and come to a new understanding of
fetal development. 
And some women switch to the pro-life side because of their
experiences with abortion. Which brings me to my next point…
*****
6. Many of us are post-abortive…
…and converted to the pro-life
side for that very reason.
This is really an extension of
the previous point. Pro-choicers seem to think the pro-life movement is made up
of people with no experience: no relationship problems, health issues,
financial hardships, postponed education, complicated careers, and, above all,
crisis pregnancies. They seem to think someone would only be against abortion
if they were out of touch with life’s hardships and naively idealistic about
how people should handle crises.
But (again), pro-life people are
roughly half of the country. We span political views, ethnic groups, and
income brackets
(in
fact, we’re more likely than pro-choicers to be low-income). We’re not as
different from you as you might think. And that includes the fact that some of
us know exactly what it’s like to have to choose. And while many of us have
chosen life (point #5), not all of us have.
Now, just as pro-choicers shouldn’t
believe every pro-life woman would choose abortion if put in the position,
pro-lifers shouldn’t believe every woman who gets an abortion will end up
regretting it. It’s more of a mixed bag than
that
. Some women
don’t regret–not in the moment, not years later.
But some
do
. Some feel abortion
traumatized them
, and they can no longer accept abortion as a legal right. People
assume we’re pro-life because of a lack of experience, when in many cases it’s exactly our experiences that brought us here.
*****
7. We care about what happens to the child after birth.
7a.
But first, this accusation is nonsensical.
We’re against abortion because we
think it should generally be illegal to kill people. By “people” we mean
morally relevant human beings, which of course is how we see the fetus. We get
you don’t agree, and that’s really the crux of the debate.
But understand that, from our
perspective, saying we can’t be anti-abortion until we’ve solved problems like
child poverty or a messed up foster care system is as ridiculous to our ears as
if you said we can’t speak out against child abuse unless we are going to adopt
all abused children. Does anyone actually believe that? Would you argue people can’t
condemn child marriage unless they will personally pay off the child’s family
debts? People can’t say slaves should be freed unless they’re prepared to personally
house and employ all the newly emancipated? Suggesting people can’t call out
human rights violations unless they personally have the resources to absorb all
impact is just a terrible precedent.
7b.
Pro-life organizations do help born people.
Bad precedent aside, we do care about what happens after the
child is born.
There are a lot of pro-life projects
revolving around helping mothers and their children. Students for Life of
America encourages it’s 900+ campus groups to organize diaper drives and to pursue Pregnant on Campus initiatives, which connect pregnant
and parenting students with resources for healthcare, housing,
clothing and food assistance, child care, insurance, financial aid, and more. Feminists For Life has fought child exclusion
provisions in welfare reform, worked to get poor working pregnant women
prenatal care through SCHIP, and advocated for the Enhanced Child Support
Enforcement Act. And there are 1,000s of pregnancy resource centers across the country that provide
maternity and baby clothes, diapers, wipes, baby wash, strollers, bouncy seats,
infant toys, referrals (for housing, employment resources, and educational,
financial, and social assistance), parenting classes, even laptops, phones, and cars.
Pregnancy resource centers also
work to connect women with adoption services if that is what they need. And
plenty of pro-lifers have themselves adopted
children
in dire
situations
. Here’s a list of countless ways individual pro-life people have helped low-income single mothers.
7c.
Pro-life individuals help too, independent of their pro-life work.
When people ask “If you’re really pro-life, why don’t you care
about [X quality of life] issue?” they seem to assume that everyone who does care about and work on the issue
they’ve picked is pro-choice. But I’m not sure why they make that assumption.
Between September 2013 and September 2014, over 62 million people did volunteer work of some type (rock on, guys). As
far as I know, no one polled the volunteers about their views on abortion, but with
the country split on the issue it seems like quite a leap to assume few or none
of them are pro-life. Sometimes it seems like unless we assemble en masse with
picket signs that say “I’m anti-abortion but today I’m protesting this other
issue,” people will insist we don’t care about anything else.
And yet, for example, my very
anti-abortion grandmother volunteers every week packaging food and other
supplies for local low-income families. For a long while my pro-life brother
and I spent our volunteer time tutoring at the Boys and Girls Club. Before that
I did volunteer tutoring at a nearby state prison, and since then my brother
has offered free tutoring at his university. My anti-abortion dad offers
parolees jobs and training, and has attended some of their hearings as a
character witness. During the first year of her son’s life, my pro-life sister
pumped and froze her extra breast milk so she could donate it to a little girl
with spinal muscular atrophy. (Incidentally, for young mothers with no funds
for charity, donating breast milk is an excellent way to help other moms and
their babies. Learn more here.)
My pro-life mother spent years
taking care of an elderly woman she met who had no children and no local
family. My mom put a lot of her time into keeping the woman company, taking her
on outings, driving her to and from doctor’s appointments, and making sure she
was taking her medications all the way until the end. Then Mom took care of the
woman’s funeral arrangements and issues with her estate. When pro-choicers claim
pro-lifers only care about people until they’re born, I think of my family, and
then think how ridiculously false this accusation is.
And my family isn’t an anomaly in
the pro-life movement. I know pro-life activists who work for gay rights, children’s
rights, and animal rights. I have pro-life friends who conduct cultural
proficiency trainings to try to help diverse organizations understand the
cultural and racial differences among the people they work with. One of my
pro-life friends has based his career helping families, foster providers, and
agencies that work with children with behavior challenges or mental health
issues. I have two other pro-life friends who do long-distance running to raise
money for causes like fighting human trafficking.
I know these are all anecdotes.
If there were statistics on the type and extent of charity and volunteer work pro-life
people do, I’d happily give them to you. But absent that rather specific
research, I point to the Catholic Church—widely known for its
anti-abortion stance
—and
the massive amounts of charity work it does. Catholic Charities USA serves over
10 million people per year, providing food, shelter, education, financial planning, adoption assistance, services to refugees and
immigrants
, and
more. In 2015 alone they spent over $3.8 billion
on these projects. Pause and imagine the number of Catholics who donate their
money and time to make that happen.
That’s not to say that every
Catholic contributing to these causes is pro-life. There are plenty of pro-choice
Catholics
, and I
don’t believe pro-lifers have a monopoly on helping the underserved. But it is to say that it’s highly likely a
lot of the people involved in these various humanitarian efforts are also
anti-abortion, especially given the correlation between religiosity and a
pro-life perspective. You can see similar stats finding that Christians are twice as likely to adopt and 50% more likely to be foster parents as Americans on average.
See also:
*****

With a topic as highly polarized
as abortion, it’s easy to view our opponents as fools at best, evil at worst,
certainly deficient in various ways. And while there really will be fools and
even genuinely bad people out there (on both sides), I do believe the reality
is that most pro-lifers and pro-choicers aren’t quite as different as the
political narratives suggest. I mean, yes, we start with some fundamentally
different premises and those are worth debating. But most of the caricatures
are just that. And I’ve found within friendships even the more passionate people
from each side are able to see that.

[Published on 2/24/16.]

7 things pro-lifers wish our pro-choice friends understood about us.

Recently my FB newsfeed delivered
me this gem: “5 Thing Pro-Choicers Wish Their
Anti-Choice Friends Understood
.”
To my disappointment, the article includes plenty of sarcasm, negative
assumptions, and (in my experience) incorrect stereotypes. It certainly doesn’t
come off as a conversation between friends, so maybe the title was just
tongue-in-cheek.
But I really do have pro-choice
friends. Family too. I get along with them well, for the most part. And I
appreciate when we have opportunities to explore each other’s perspectives in a
non-combative way. To that end, I wrote this article as if I were discussing
these issues with friends. I know there are plenty of people who feel more
comfortable with the cartoon villain versions of their ideological opponents…
Pictured: Pro-lifers?
…but if you recognize that life
is more shades of gray than black and white, this post is for you. (As Timothy Brahm said, “There are no Snidely Whiplashes…”)
*****
1.
We’re
so much more than a bunch of old straight religious
white Republican men.
I actually think that anyone who
is (a) intellectually honest and (b) paying enough attention probably already
realizes this, so I am going to go through these misconceptions kind of quickly
and move on to the less known issues.
1a.
We’re not all old.

The younger generations are traditionally more left-leaning, and as we increasingly enter
the political sphere the effects are obvious. But despite liberalizing trends
in national opinion on other issues (gay marriage, women in combat, drug legalization), there’s been no equivalent
swing to the pro-choice view on abortion. In fact, polls show that the youngest
generation is at
least as anti-abortion
, if not more so, than previous generations.  
See also:
1b.
We’re not all straight.

To be fair, this is something I seem to have to remind certain segments of the
pro-life movement about as much as my pro-choice friends. It’s more difficult
to find polling data on this, so instead I will point again to The Pro-Life Alliance of Gays and
Lesbians
. You
can also read more about the experiences of pro-life activists who are LGBT
here: “How does the pro-life movement
look to LGBT pro-lifers?

“Human rights start when human life begins.”

See also:
1c.
We’re not all religious.
a. Depending on polls, between
one sixth and one fifth of nonreligious Americans are anti-abortion. (See “Are you One of Six Million?”)
b. The non-religious pro-lifer
isn’t a “fake” secularist either. Atheist apologist Christopher Hitchens himself argued on behalf of the
unborn child.
c. The U.S. is becoming less
religious all the time; in particular, the youngest generation identifies less
with religion than generations before us. Yet national anti-abortion sentiment
remains largely unchanged—for every generation.
See also:
1d.
We’re not all white.

Polls show 51% of African Americans and 61%
of Hispanic Americans think abortion is morally wrong. And a range of 30% to 40%
of African Americans as well as 50% of Hispanic Americans think abortion should
generally be illegal. A multivariate analysis of answers about abortion from
the General Social Survey going back four decades found that black men and
women have consistently been less accepting of abortion than white men and
women.
Many people on both sides of the debate are aware of the
disproportionate rates of abortion for African American and Latino communities.
It’s important to recognize this disproportion isn’t something people of color
readily accept. Many people within these communities are anti-abortion.

 
See also:
1e.
We’re not all Republican.
  Nearly a third of Democrats and a fourth of
people who describe themselves as “liberal” also describe themselves as
“pro-life.”

Similarly, nearly a third of Democrats say abortion should generally be illegal.
Historically the pro-life
movement was actually quite progressive, and the Democratic Party was
more accepting of pro-lifers in its ranks. Unfortunately, now being pro-choice
seems to be a litmus test of a “true” Democrat. It makes sense to me that the
same groups who insist all pro-lifers are Republicans insist any
self-identifying pro-life Democrat isn’t a “real” Democrat, regardless of how
many leftist positions the person holds. But wishing the stereotype-defying
pro-lifers will disappear won’t make it so.


See Also:
1f.
We’re not all men.

Not even close, actually. Of all the demographic stereotypes pushed on the
pro-life movement, I think the gender narrative is the most strident and
possibly most dishonest.
Even if the ratios aren’t 1:1,
there are real correlations between being pro-life and right-wing or being
pro-life and religious. And given the strong correlation between being LGBT and
being a left-winger, there’s probably a real correlation between being pro-life
and straight. And while the data isn’t there to support the “old” and “white”
stereotypes, people don’t harp on those factors nearly as often as they repeat
the gender myth.
The “anti-choice war on women”
narrative is ubiquitous: out-of-touch, controlling, misogynistic men are the
driving force of the pro-life movement, and any woman who doesn’t hate herself
is pro-choice. By now the idea is conventional wisdom. It’s also total
nonsense.
According to Gallup, once you account for the margin
of error, women are just as likely as men to think abortion should be illegal
all or most of the time. Moreover, there are significantly more women who think
abortion should generally be illegal than there are those who think it should generally
be legal.
And this trend is reflected in
the makeup of the pro-life movement. Despite the endlessly echoed (and uncited)
claim that “77% of anti-abortion leaders are men,” much of our movement is led by women.
I think it’s possible for
intellectually honest people who just aren’t that involved in the abortion
debate to miss the pro-life secularists, LGBT people, and other non-traditional
pro-lifers. But a person would have to really not be paying attention to
genuinely believe the pro-life woman is an anomaly.

(Click to enlarge.)
See also:
*****
2. We’re not anti-woman. This accusation actually comes in two forms.
2a.
Anti-woman motivations.
The
first and more common form is that pro-lifers are against abortion because we don’t respect or like women.
That is, our misogyny motivates us to try to control women’s bodies, choices,
and lives.
I think this idea comes about largely
because many pro-choicers assume the fetus is not a morally relevant human
being, and, importantly, they further assume pro-lifers secretly or
subconsciously agree with this view. If that’s the case, our anti-abortion
efforts can’t truly be motivated by concern for human lives; there must be some
other, more sinister reason we’re making such a big deal about abortion. It
must be because we’re misogynists, and we talk about human rights only as a
cover for our disdain.
But this perspective doesn’t
explain why abortion views don’t divide along gender lines or why there are so
many female pro-life activists, including pro-life leaders (see point #1f). And
it definitely doesn’t explain the existence of feminist pro-lifers—by that I
mean people who share traditionally feminist goals outside of abortion on
demand. For example there are plenty of pro-lifers who care about fighting rape culture, decreasing gender stereotypes, increasing support for pregnant women (and parents and families in
general), and generally fighting prejudice based on gender, sexuality, and race. You can be for all of those
goals and also against abortion. I am.
And, most of the time, when I
develop friendships of some depth with people who are pro-choice, they
recognize my passion for gender issues and my embrace of the feminist label,
and they see that my anti-abortion stance is based on reasoning quite separate
from any anti-woman sentiment. This is one of the reasons I think it’s so good
for us to have friends who think differently than we do: friendship destroys
prejudice. We’ve seen this when it comes to race and sexuality, and I think it
can also be true for politics. Some of my pro-choice friends have told me they
think differently about pro-lifers just for having known me, and I feel the
same way about them.
I’m not pretending there’s no
such thing as a misogynist pro-lifer. Misogyny is a real problem, and I believe
some pro-lifers are misogynists because some people are misogynists (and a lot
of people are pro-life). But I don’t think the two views are as correlated as
our opposition likes to insist. In fact, I suspect the more you get to know
pro-lifers, the more you’ll see how much many of us care (see point #7) and the
less you’ll believe we all just hate women.

Meet Destiny.
2b.
Anti-woman effects.

The second form of the anti-woman accusation is sort of a fall back from the
first. When face-to-face with pro-lifers who clearly do care about women, some
pro-choicers will say that, while we may not have specifically anti-woman motivations, it doesn’t matter because
our goal of restricting abortion will have anti-woman effects.
First, this makes the
“anti-woman” accusation pretty misleading. We generally accuse people of being
“anti-[whatever group]” based on their motivations, not their effects.
Conflating motivation and effect is the tactic used to accuse pro-woman
policies of being “anti-man,” religious diversity policies of being
“anti-Christian,” or affirmative action policies of being “anti-white.” This
tactic ignores the positive, affirmative reasons people might hold a position
and insists such people, by definition, are “anti-[whatever group],” regardless
of their actual motivations or feelings on the subject. So I think this version
of the “anti-woman” accusation is pretty disingenuous.
Second, it’s not at all clear
that abortion restrictions are anti-woman while fully embracing abortion is
pro-woman. Many of us believe unrestricted abortion is the excuse society uses to not support pregnant and
parenting women and the excuse certain kinds of men
use

to guiltlessly skip out on unplanned fatherhood. “Choice” doesn’t have such a
nice connotation when it comes in the form of “well it was your choice to have
the baby, so you deal with it.” Feminists against abortion, including some of our country’s
most prominent feminist
foremothers
,
have long called attention to how abortion can exploit women.
Beyond that, abortion is so
heavily politicized that some don’t want to admit there’s any negative aspect or moral complexity to it, lest they give credence
to the pro-life view. But this means realities like fetal development or the link
between abortion and pre-term birth
are glossed over, leaving women
without information they may have wished they had. It means increasing insistence that there’s nothing to regret
or feel shame over, alienating and dismissing the
women

who do struggle with those feelings. It means downplaying how abortion is used
to cover up sex trafficking. It also means horrors like
Kermit Gosnell’s clinic—in which both a
woman and already-born children were killed
—can fester in the vacuum of any real oversight and, when they are discovered,
can go largely unnoticed in the vacuum of media coverage.
I’m not saying the average
pro-choice person is aware of or accepts all of these problems. I don’t think
that’s true. But I am saying that if being “anti-woman” is about effects, not
motivation, than our country’s relatively liberal embrace of abortion can be quite
anti-woman.
The “War on Women” rhetoric would
have you believe abortion is unquestionably at the heart of women’s liberation
and therefore anyone against abortion is against women. But in reality abortion’s
effects on women are more complicated than that—so much so that, even independent
of the question of fetal value, people who care about women can have compelling
reasons to come down on either side of the abortion debate.
See Also: 
*****
3.
We’re pro-contraception.
I can understand why people would
get the impression that if I am anti-abortion I must be anti-contraception.
There are plenty of pro-life organizations and leaders who are openly
anti-contraception, and if you aren’t very involved in a given political
movement, it’s easy to assume after a cursory glance that the most prominent activists
represent the majority of the movement.
But in this case you’d be mistaken.
Polls suggest a
minimum of 78% of pro-lifers find
contraception morally acceptable. And
it’s not just that we think it’s alright in theory; we think so in practice,
too.
Research suggests the strong majority (over 80%) of
sexually active American women use some form of artificial contraception. Note
that, if 
about half of American women are pro-life, this means the
majority of self-described sexually active pro-life women use artificial
contraception.
(Pro-choice author Will Saletan
over at Slate has a great post explaining why the data suggests
pro-lifers are not anti-contraception.)
Certainly SPL takes a
pro-contraception stance. If you’re interested, you can read more about why here.
See also:
*****
4. We like sex.
4a.
The “anti-sex” accusation stems mostly from our different views of fetal life,
not our different views of sex.
There are a lot of different
reasons people are pro-choice.  I think
most pro-choicers empathize with the very difficult position an unplanned
pregnancy can put a woman in, and many are concerned about protecting bodily
rights.
But it also seems some people
advocate for abortion primarily based on sex. That is, they think people ought
to be able to have sex lives unhindered by potential procreation. Such an
abortion advocate might describe this idea in terms of sexual liberation and
gender equality, but for many on our side of the fence, it doesn’t sound so
noble. For those of us who view the fetus as a morally relevant human being,
advocating fetal destruction in the name of sexual liberation sounds supremely…backwards.
 It sounds like valuing an active,
enjoyable sex life over not killing people.
But of course that’s not how most
abortion advocates see it. In my experience, most of the “sexual liberation”
pro-choicers don’t see the fetus as a human being, or at least not a morally
relevant one. So it’s not about advocating an active sex life over actual human
lives. It’s about valuing sexual freedom over nebulous, irrelevant “clumps of
cells.” If I thought that’s all abortion involved, I would feel similarly.
In other words, our views differ more
based on how we think of fetal life than how we think of sex.
It’s important for pro-lifers to
understand this, rather than hurl accusations of selfish, sexual promiscuity at
the other side. It’s likewise important for pro-choicers to see this, rather than
accuse us of simply hating sex. Saying people should make sexual decisions such
that they’re not in a position to want an abortion doesn’t mean we hate sex any
more than saying people shouldn’t drink and drive means we hate driving. Drive
as much as you like. But do so safely and, above all, please don’t kill anyone.
4b.
Different views of sex are still a factor, but not as big of one as people
think.
I think most of the anti-sex
accusation comes down to different views of fetal life, but not all of it. Religious
people are more likely than non-religious people to be pro-life, and plenty of
religious people are more likely to speak out against sex outside of marriage.
I think there’s a decent argument to be made that “anti-premarital-sex,” or the broader “anti-reckless-sex,” are not equivalent to “anti-sex.” Plenty of people
who think it’s better to wait until marriage have active, enjoyable sex lives
with their spouses and like sex quite a lot. But I think the more compelling
point is that most pro-lifers don’t actually wait until marriage to have sex.
How do I know this? First and
foremost, because the vast majority of people in general have
premarital sex, and pro-lifers are about half of the country. So there’s that
math. Besides that, the pro-life movement doesn’t fit the 1:1 correlation to
conservative Christians that so many people expect (see point #1). We like sex,
we have sex outside of marriage, we have sex using contraception (point #2), and
we still think it’s wrong to kill fetuses.
See also:
*****
5. We experience unplanned pregnancies too…
…but no, that doesn’t
automatically mean we turn pro-choice.
Some
pro-choicers seem to think we are only anti-abortion because we just don’t
understand how frightening and life-changing an unplanned pregnancy can be, and
that if we were to be put in that difficult position, we’d choose abortion too.
And,
interestingly, is isn’t just pro-choicers who make this assumption. Some
anti-contraception pro-lifers seem to think that anyone who has sex while using
contraception (which,
as shown in point #3, would include most pro-lifers) isn’t
“open to life” and thus will choose abortion if they accidentally procreate.
But it’s not the
case. According to the CDC, about 
37%
of births result from unplanned conceptions
. In 2012 there were about
3.9 million
 births, meaning over 1.4 million women carried
unplanned pregnancies to term. 
That’s not to say every self-described pro-life woman always
chooses life. It’s true, of course, that some pro-life women do
rescind their
views
and get an abortion. But it’s also true that plenty of women stand by their convictions, carrying out
crisis pregnancies
even when (from a pro-choice perspective) abortion may have
been much simpler. Insisting we’re all one unplanned pregnancy away from being
pro-choice not only implies none of us are sincere in our beliefs, but also
demeans or outright ignores the courage, sacrifice, and love with which so many
mothers have carried and birthed their unplanned children. In that sense,
frankly, I think it’s a pretty anti-woman thing to say.



Claudia and her “crisis pregnancy,” Taylor.

And meanwhile pointing out inconsistency isn’t as meaningful as
so many people suggest, mostly because it goes both ways. Just as some women
switch to the pro-choice side in the face of an intimidating pregnancy, some
women switch to the pro-life side
when
they experience a planned pregnancy
and come to a new understanding of
fetal development. 
And some women switch to the pro-life side because of their
experiences with abortion. Which brings me to my next point…
*****
6. Many of us are post-abortive…
…and converted to the pro-life
side for that very reason.
This is really an extension of
the previous point. Pro-choicers seem to think the pro-life movement is made up
of people with no experience: no relationship problems, health issues,
financial hardships, postponed education, complicated careers, and, above all,
crisis pregnancies. They seem to think someone would only be against abortion
if they were out of touch with life’s hardships and naively idealistic about
how people should handle crises.
But (again), pro-life people are
roughly half of the country. We span political views, ethnic groups, and
income brackets
(in
fact, we’re more likely than pro-choicers to be low-income). We’re not as
different from you as you might think. And that includes the fact that some of
us know exactly what it’s like to have to choose. And while many of us have
chosen life (point #5), not all of us have.
Now, just as pro-choicers shouldn’t
believe every pro-life woman would choose abortion if put in the position,
pro-lifers shouldn’t believe every woman who gets an abortion will end up
regretting it. It’s more of a mixed bag than
that
. Some women
don’t regret–not in the moment, not years later.
But some
do
. Some feel abortion
traumatized them
, and they can no longer accept abortion as a legal right. People
assume we’re pro-life because of a lack of experience, when in many cases it’s exactly our experiences that brought us here.
*****
7. We care about what happens to the child after birth.
7a.
But first, this accusation is nonsensical.
We’re against abortion because we
think it should generally be illegal to kill people. By “people” we mean
morally relevant human beings, which of course is how we see the fetus. We get
you don’t agree, and that’s really the crux of the debate.
But understand that, from our
perspective, saying we can’t be anti-abortion until we’ve solved problems like
child poverty or a messed up foster care system is as ridiculous to our ears as
if you said we can’t speak out against child abuse unless we are going to adopt
all abused children. Does anyone actually believe that? Would you argue people can’t
condemn child marriage unless they will personally pay off the child’s family
debts? People can’t say slaves should be freed unless they’re prepared to personally
house and employ all the newly emancipated? Suggesting people can’t call out
human rights violations unless they personally have the resources to absorb all
impact is just a terrible precedent.
7b.
Pro-life organizations do help born people.
Bad precedent aside, we do care about what happens after the
child is born.
There are a lot of pro-life projects
revolving around helping mothers and their children. Students for Life of
America encourages it’s 900+ campus groups to organize diaper drives and to pursue Pregnant on Campus initiatives, which connect pregnant
and parenting students with resources for healthcare, housing,
clothing and food assistance, child care, insurance, financial aid, and more. Feminists For Life has fought child exclusion
provisions in welfare reform, worked to get poor working pregnant women
prenatal care through SCHIP, and advocated for the Enhanced Child Support
Enforcement Act. And there are 1,000s of pregnancy resource centers across the country that provide
maternity and baby clothes, diapers, wipes, baby wash, strollers, bouncy seats,
infant toys, referrals (for housing, employment resources, and educational,
financial, and social assistance), parenting classes, even laptops, phones, and cars.
Pregnancy resource centers also
work to connect women with adoption services if that is what they need. And
plenty of pro-lifers have themselves adopted
children
in dire
situations
. Here’s a list of countless ways individual pro-life people have helped low-income single mothers.
7c.
Pro-life individuals help too, independent of their pro-life work.
When people ask “If you’re really pro-life, why don’t you care
about [X quality of life] issue?” they seem to assume that everyone who does care about and work on the issue
they’ve picked is pro-choice. But I’m not sure why they make that assumption.
Between September 2013 and September 2014, over 62 million people did volunteer work of some type (rock on, guys). As
far as I know, no one polled the volunteers about their views on abortion, but with
the country split on the issue it seems like quite a leap to assume few or none
of them are pro-life. Sometimes it seems like unless we assemble en masse with
picket signs that say “I’m anti-abortion but today I’m protesting this other
issue,” people will insist we don’t care about anything else.
And yet, for example, my very
anti-abortion grandmother volunteers every week packaging food and other
supplies for local low-income families. For a long while my pro-life brother
and I spent our volunteer time tutoring at the Boys and Girls Club. Before that
I did volunteer tutoring at a nearby state prison, and since then my brother
has offered free tutoring at his university. My anti-abortion dad offers
parolees jobs and training, and has attended some of their hearings as a
character witness. During the first year of her son’s life, my pro-life sister
pumped and froze her extra breast milk so she could donate it to a little girl
with spinal muscular atrophy. (Incidentally, for young mothers with no funds
for charity, donating breast milk is an excellent way to help other moms and
their babies. Learn more here.)
My pro-life mother spent years
taking care of an elderly woman she met who had no children and no local
family. My mom put a lot of her time into keeping the woman company, taking her
on outings, driving her to and from doctor’s appointments, and making sure she
was taking her medications all the way until the end. Then Mom took care of the
woman’s funeral arrangements and issues with her estate. When pro-choicers claim
pro-lifers only care about people until they’re born, I think of my family, and
then think how ridiculously false this accusation is.
And my family isn’t an anomaly in
the pro-life movement. I know pro-life activists who work for gay rights, children’s
rights, and animal rights. I have pro-life friends who conduct cultural
proficiency trainings to try to help diverse organizations understand the
cultural and racial differences among the people they work with. One of my
pro-life friends has based his career helping families, foster providers, and
agencies that work with children with behavior challenges or mental health
issues. I have two other pro-life friends who do long-distance running to raise
money for causes like fighting human trafficking.
I know these are all anecdotes.
If there were statistics on the type and extent of charity and volunteer work pro-life
people do, I’d happily give them to you. But absent that rather specific
research, I point to the Catholic Church—widely known for its
anti-abortion stance
—and
the massive amounts of charity work it does. Catholic Charities USA serves over
10 million people per year, providing food, shelter, education, financial planning, adoption assistance, services to refugees and
immigrants
, and
more. In 2015 alone they spent over $3.8 billion
on these projects. Pause and imagine the number of Catholics who donate their
money and time to make that happen.
That’s not to say that every
Catholic contributing to these causes is pro-life. There are plenty of pro-choice
Catholics
, and I
don’t believe pro-lifers have a monopoly on helping the underserved. But it is to say that it’s highly likely a
lot of the people involved in these various humanitarian efforts are also
anti-abortion, especially given the correlation between religiosity and a
pro-life perspective. You can see similar stats finding that Christians are twice as likely to adopt and 50% more likely to be foster parents as Americans on average.
See also:
*****

With a topic as highly polarized
as abortion, it’s easy to view our opponents as fools at best, evil at worst,
certainly deficient in various ways. And while there really will be fools and
even genuinely bad people out there (on both sides), I do believe the reality
is that most pro-lifers and pro-choicers aren’t quite as different as the
political narratives suggest. I mean, yes, we start with some fundamentally
different premises and those are worth debating. But most of the caricatures
are just that. And I’ve found within friendships even the more passionate people
from each side are able to see that.

[Published on 2/24/16.]

In-depth interview: Kristi Burkhart, Executive Director, Pregnancy Care Center

Kristi Burkhart is Director of Pregnancy Care Center, a locally organized and funded organization that has been helping women and their babies in Fresno, California since 1984. Here she talks to us about how she got involved with a pregnancy center, what kind of help the center offers, how the center navigates working with people of diverse backgrounds, and how others who are interested can get involved.
Personal Background:

How did you get
started working at PCC? What draws you to pregnancy care compared to other
types of pro-life work?
I had recently left a position as a full-time teacher and
was looking to volunteer in the community. I responded to an announcement in
the church bulletin regarding an orientation for volunteers at a pregnancy
center. I was drawn to pregnancy care because I am adopted (my birthmother had
an unplanned pregnancy in the mid 60’s) and also because I have many friends
who are post-abortive and have been deeply wounded by the decision to abort;
they thought they had no other choice at the time.
I remember my volunteer interview. I was thinking, “You
think you are interviewing me, but really I am interviewing you.” I was not familiar with pregnancy
care organizations and was leery that they would be very political and stereotypical
in their approach to women, in which case I would have to gracefully say “no
thanks.” I was pleasantly surprised!

What is your least
favorite part of your job? What do you enjoy the most?
 
Being in administration, my least favorite part of my job is
staffing and staff management. It is very difficult to keep all positions
filled with trained, competent (and preferably bilingual) people. It’s also
difficult to make sure the staff are working to their strengths, and to work
with them through their individual personal needs. There’s vacation time, sick
time, broken down cars, pets dying, children getting sick, etc. We have to work
through all of that just like many organizations do.
I really enjoy being able to teach and encourage people
through my job. I love training volunteers and watching the lights go on as they
explore what they think they know about our clients and who our clients really are. I love teaching youth
about healthy sexual integrity (and shocking them with my perspectives, which
aren’t too far from their own!) I can help them realize they truly are
responsible for their own boundaries and need to decide for themselves what is
best, but only after understanding the potential consequences of sexual
intimacy. I love when I can encourage those who are struggling, letting them
know that they are not alone and that there are good answers available. My job
allows me to help clients, volunteers, staff, or donors, whether the issue is
unexpected pregnancy or something entirely different.

General Questions:

What services does
PCC offer? Are there any costs to the clients? If not, how does PCC get
funding?
As a fully licensed medical facility we offer free pregnancy
tests, limited OB ultrasound exams, pregnancy options counseling, pregnancy and
child-birth classes, and community referrals. We also offer sexual integrity
seminars, post-abortive support, miscarriage support, and a Just 4 Guys group.
There are never costs to our clients. All services are free
and confidential. We do not bill any insurance provider either, so our services
are also free to the tax payer. We are 100% funded by this community and for
this community through one-time and monthly donations from individuals,
organizations, and churches. We have four PCC annual fundraisers: a banquet, a “Change 4
Babies” campaign, a Men’s BBQ, and a
Ladies’ High Tea.

What are some of the
more common circumstances your clients have that lead to crisis pregnancy?
I would call them “unplanned” or “unexpected,” rather than “crisis.”
“Crisis” sounds like an emergency, trauma, or something dangerous—even a
tragedy. “Unexpected” or “unplanned” sounds more realistic: they are caught off
guard and unsure what to do because the pregnancy was an accident.
I think the more common circumstances are that the girls are
young, unmarried, and still in school (high school or college). 59% of our
clients are between ages 15 to 24 (10 year age range), whereas only 40% are
between ages 25 to 50 (26 year age range). Less than 1% of our clients are
under age 15. We also often have single moms come in who are separated or
divorced and who find themselves unexpectedly pregnant.
What qualities do you
look for when hiring staff or selecting volunteers?
We look for people who are pro-life, compassionate, humble,
kind, and open. They need to be good listeners and non-judgmental. They can’t
be pushy; we look for people who are eager to serve a woman with an unexpected
pregnancy regardless of her decision (that is, even if she chooses to abort, or
has chosen to abort before). We look for people with a certain level of
personal sexual integrity; after all, we can’t ask others to practice a
lifestyle we don’t practice ourselves. And we are a faith-based organization,
so we do look for people with faith in Jesus. However, it’s essential that our
staff can lay aside any agenda they hold and serve each woman with compassion
and integrity.
Your clinic is
located across the street from an abortion clinic. Tell us what that is like.
We are in front of the abortion clinic and share a parking
lot. It’s interesting. There’s no open hostility, but there is a very real
tension. We see their staff outside, and as much as I try to smile or wave they
just ignore me. No offense taken on my part. If mail or boxes are delivered to
the wrong address, we are very congenial with each other when we walk the
packages over.
Our center and the clinic have some shared clients. Sometimes
a woman comes through our door for her “appointment” and we can tell that she
probably meant to go to the clinic instead (most of the time she won’t say the
word “abortion” and she’ll have a hard time looking at the receptionist). Even
if we are pretty sure she has an appointment with the clinic, we still have to
ask what the appointment is for, in case she actually does have an appointment
with us for a pregnancy test or an ultrasound. If she is looking for the clinic
instead, we tell her she doesn’t have an appointment with us and ask if she is
sure she is pregnant. We offer her our services. These conversations sometimes
lead to an appointment with us instead of an abortion. Other times, she walks
out the door and we don’t see her again. Our job is to be here and available in
either case.  Sometimes she leaves, but
returns again.

Religion and
Politics:

Does PCC have a
religious affiliation? How does this affect your day-to-day work?
We are non-denominational but faith-based, and we ask all
staff and volunteers to sign a basic statement of faith. You and I had a
conversation about asking our clients one simple question when we are
discussing their options with them, “Where does God fit into this for you?” A
vast majority (80-90%) of Americans believe in God, so it’s an important
question to ask. In many cases her faith is part of her decision making process
and part of how she deals with the decision she makes. So we ask “Where does
God fit into this for you?” and then it’s our job to respect her response. If
she wants to discuss it, we are happy to have spiritual discussions with her
and even share the gospel. But again, only if she wants to go down that road;
her needs supersede any religious agenda.

How do you make your
center a comfortable place for your non-religious clients?
There are no religious pictures or icons around. There are no
scriptures written on the walls or over the doorposts, haha. We do not force a
spiritual discussion or biblical resources onto our clients. We respect her
wishes and ask permission to share anything having to do with religion.

Does your center
provide adoption referrals? If so, does your center have a policy regarding
adoption agencies that work with LGBT parents?
Yes, we provide adoption agency referrals. There are four
local agencies on our list so that clients have choices. We do not have a
policy about agencies that work with LGBT parents. Also, the quality of care provided to each person
seeking services at PCC is consistent regardless of socioeconomic status. 

Many people believe that
pregnancy centers give their clients incomplete information or pressure their
clients into making a specific decision. How do you respond to that idea?
It is against everything that I stand for to give incomplete
information or to emotionally or spiritually manipulate people. I also believe
that abortion hurts women first—it isn’t just about the life of the unborn. These
two beliefs, which I hold dear, are precisely why I was interviewing PCC before
becoming a volunteer 14 years ago. I would not have gotten involved in the
first place had PCC been contrary to my stand on these two personal issues. PCC
is very careful to use only researched and medically accurate information and to
train, train, and retrain our staff and volunteers. We have had volunteers-in-training who were too forceful or zealous in the
their approach, and we asked them to step down.
PCC is also affiliated with two national organizations that
provide training materials, conferences, policy suggestions and so forth. I
find these organizations to be those of integrity that I can personally align
with. As Executive Director for PCC, it is important for me to understand the
organizations PCC is directly associated with and their leadership.
With that said, there are a few pregnancy resources centers and pregnancy
medical centers that do not follow all the guidelines set before them
by the national organizations to which they are affiliated. This is a travesty
and misrepresentation of the rest of us, and it greatly angers me.
I understand that everyone comes into this type of pro-life
work to serve with a genuine heart for women and babies. We are sincere but we
also usually come with an agenda without even realizing it. If our service to
our clients is not based on love, truth, and integrity then we should step
aside. It takes good training and more good training to be ready to serve women
with unexpected pregnancies.

Perspectives:

What advice would you
give to someone looking to start a pregnancy center?
First, make sure you have the support of your family and
best friends—people who believe you are called to this. Second, visit at least
3-5 centers in communities with demographics similar to your own. Third,
contact the national organizations and align yourself with at least one for
support, training, and resources. Finally, make sure you have adequate support
from your community—a portion of the community that you can draw on for
volunteers, vision, cheerleading, and, yes, financial support too.

What advice do you
have for people who don’t work at pregnancy centers but still want to help
women with crisis pregnancy?

Listen well. Educate yourself and give only accurate
information that you know to be true (don’t believe everything you hear and
read either….research for yourself!) Remember, you could be her if you had her
background, knowledge, and experiences. Love her. Really see her, as a person—it’s not just about the
life of the child she may be carrying, it’s about her too. Understand the
difficulties she faces: in her relationships, in her schooling or career, in
her ability to provide basic necessities, etc. Don’t shoot from the hip.
You are dealing with at least two lives here. Set aside your own agenda, and
remember: love, truth, and integrity.

In-depth interview: Kristi Burkhart, Executive Director, Pregnancy Care Center

Kristi Burkhart is Director of Pregnancy Care Center, a locally organized and funded organization that has been helping women and their babies in Fresno, California since 1984. Here she talks to us about how she got involved with a pregnancy center, what kind of help the center offers, how the center navigates working with people of diverse backgrounds, and how others who are interested can get involved.
Personal Background:

How did you get
started working at PCC? What draws you to pregnancy care compared to other
types of pro-life work?
I had recently left a position as a full-time teacher and
was looking to volunteer in the community. I responded to an announcement in
the church bulletin regarding an orientation for volunteers at a pregnancy
center. I was drawn to pregnancy care because I am adopted (my birthmother had
an unplanned pregnancy in the mid 60’s) and also because I have many friends
who are post-abortive and have been deeply wounded by the decision to abort;
they thought they had no other choice at the time.
I remember my volunteer interview. I was thinking, “You
think you are interviewing me, but really I am interviewing you.” I was not familiar with pregnancy
care organizations and was leery that they would be very political and stereotypical
in their approach to women, in which case I would have to gracefully say “no
thanks.” I was pleasantly surprised!

What is your least
favorite part of your job? What do you enjoy the most?
 
Being in administration, my least favorite part of my job is
staffing and staff management. It is very difficult to keep all positions
filled with trained, competent (and preferably bilingual) people. It’s also
difficult to make sure the staff are working to their strengths, and to work
with them through their individual personal needs. There’s vacation time, sick
time, broken down cars, pets dying, children getting sick, etc. We have to work
through all of that just like many organizations do.
I really enjoy being able to teach and encourage people
through my job. I love training volunteers and watching the lights go on as they
explore what they think they know about our clients and who our clients really are. I love teaching youth
about healthy sexual integrity (and shocking them with my perspectives, which
aren’t too far from their own!) I can help them realize they truly are
responsible for their own boundaries and need to decide for themselves what is
best, but only after understanding the potential consequences of sexual
intimacy. I love when I can encourage those who are struggling, letting them
know that they are not alone and that there are good answers available. My job
allows me to help clients, volunteers, staff, or donors, whether the issue is
unexpected pregnancy or something entirely different.

General Questions:

What services does
PCC offer? Are there any costs to the clients? If not, how does PCC get
funding?
As a fully licensed medical facility we offer free pregnancy
tests, limited OB ultrasound exams, pregnancy options counseling, pregnancy and
child-birth classes, and community referrals. We also offer sexual integrity
seminars, post-abortive support, miscarriage support, and a Just 4 Guys group.
There are never costs to our clients. All services are free
and confidential. We do not bill any insurance provider either, so our services
are also free to the tax payer. We are 100% funded by this community and for
this community through one-time and monthly donations from individuals,
organizations, and churches. We have four PCC annual fundraisers: a banquet, a “Change 4
Babies” campaign, a Men’s BBQ, and a
Ladies’ High Tea.

What are some of the
more common circumstances your clients have that lead to crisis pregnancy?
I would call them “unplanned” or “unexpected,” rather than “crisis.”
“Crisis” sounds like an emergency, trauma, or something dangerous—even a
tragedy. “Unexpected” or “unplanned” sounds more realistic: they are caught off
guard and unsure what to do because the pregnancy was an accident.
I think the more common circumstances are that the girls are
young, unmarried, and still in school (high school or college). 59% of our
clients are between ages 15 to 24 (10 year age range), whereas only 40% are
between ages 25 to 50 (26 year age range). Less than 1% of our clients are
under age 15. We also often have single moms come in who are separated or
divorced and who find themselves unexpectedly pregnant.
What qualities do you
look for when hiring staff or selecting volunteers?
We look for people who are pro-life, compassionate, humble,
kind, and open. They need to be good listeners and non-judgmental. They can’t
be pushy; we look for people who are eager to serve a woman with an unexpected
pregnancy regardless of her decision (that is, even if she chooses to abort, or
has chosen to abort before). We look for people with a certain level of
personal sexual integrity; after all, we can’t ask others to practice a
lifestyle we don’t practice ourselves. And we are a faith-based organization,
so we do look for people with faith in Jesus. However, it’s essential that our
staff can lay aside any agenda they hold and serve each woman with compassion
and integrity.
Your clinic is
located across the street from an abortion clinic. Tell us what that is like.
We are in front of the abortion clinic and share a parking
lot. It’s interesting. There’s no open hostility, but there is a very real
tension. We see their staff outside, and as much as I try to smile or wave they
just ignore me. No offense taken on my part. If mail or boxes are delivered to
the wrong address, we are very congenial with each other when we walk the
packages over.
Our center and the clinic have some shared clients. Sometimes
a woman comes through our door for her “appointment” and we can tell that she
probably meant to go to the clinic instead (most of the time she won’t say the
word “abortion” and she’ll have a hard time looking at the receptionist). Even
if we are pretty sure she has an appointment with the clinic, we still have to
ask what the appointment is for, in case she actually does have an appointment
with us for a pregnancy test or an ultrasound. If she is looking for the clinic
instead, we tell her she doesn’t have an appointment with us and ask if she is
sure she is pregnant. We offer her our services. These conversations sometimes
lead to an appointment with us instead of an abortion. Other times, she walks
out the door and we don’t see her again. Our job is to be here and available in
either case.  Sometimes she leaves, but
returns again.

Religion and
Politics:

Does PCC have a
religious affiliation? How does this affect your day-to-day work?
We are non-denominational but faith-based, and we ask all
staff and volunteers to sign a basic statement of faith. You and I had a
conversation about asking our clients one simple question when we are
discussing their options with them, “Where does God fit into this for you?” A
vast majority (80-90%) of Americans believe in God, so it’s an important
question to ask. In many cases her faith is part of her decision making process
and part of how she deals with the decision she makes. So we ask “Where does
God fit into this for you?” and then it’s our job to respect her response. If
she wants to discuss it, we are happy to have spiritual discussions with her
and even share the gospel. But again, only if she wants to go down that road;
her needs supersede any religious agenda.

How do you make your
center a comfortable place for your non-religious clients?
There are no religious pictures or icons around. There are no
scriptures written on the walls or over the doorposts, haha. We do not force a
spiritual discussion or biblical resources onto our clients. We respect her
wishes and ask permission to share anything having to do with religion.

Does your center
provide adoption referrals? If so, does your center have a policy regarding
adoption agencies that work with LGBT parents?
Yes, we provide adoption agency referrals. There are four
local agencies on our list so that clients have choices. We do not have a
policy about agencies that work with LGBT parents. Also, the quality of care provided to each person
seeking services at PCC is consistent regardless of socioeconomic status. 

Many people believe that
pregnancy centers give their clients incomplete information or pressure their
clients into making a specific decision. How do you respond to that idea?
It is against everything that I stand for to give incomplete
information or to emotionally or spiritually manipulate people. I also believe
that abortion hurts women first—it isn’t just about the life of the unborn. These
two beliefs, which I hold dear, are precisely why I was interviewing PCC before
becoming a volunteer 14 years ago. I would not have gotten involved in the
first place had PCC been contrary to my stand on these two personal issues. PCC
is very careful to use only researched and medically accurate information and to
train, train, and retrain our staff and volunteers. We have had volunteers-in-training who were too forceful or zealous in the
their approach, and we asked them to step down.
PCC is also affiliated with two national organizations that
provide training materials, conferences, policy suggestions and so forth. I
find these organizations to be those of integrity that I can personally align
with. As Executive Director for PCC, it is important for me to understand the
organizations PCC is directly associated with and their leadership.
With that said, there are a few pregnancy resources centers and pregnancy
medical centers that do not follow all the guidelines set before them
by the national organizations to which they are affiliated. This is a travesty
and misrepresentation of the rest of us, and it greatly angers me.
I understand that everyone comes into this type of pro-life
work to serve with a genuine heart for women and babies. We are sincere but we
also usually come with an agenda without even realizing it. If our service to
our clients is not based on love, truth, and integrity then we should step
aside. It takes good training and more good training to be ready to serve women
with unexpected pregnancies.

Perspectives:

What advice would you
give to someone looking to start a pregnancy center?
First, make sure you have the support of your family and
best friends—people who believe you are called to this. Second, visit at least
3-5 centers in communities with demographics similar to your own. Third,
contact the national organizations and align yourself with at least one for
support, training, and resources. Finally, make sure you have adequate support
from your community—a portion of the community that you can draw on for
volunteers, vision, cheerleading, and, yes, financial support too.

What advice do you
have for people who don’t work at pregnancy centers but still want to help
women with crisis pregnancy?

Listen well. Educate yourself and give only accurate
information that you know to be true (don’t believe everything you hear and
read either….research for yourself!) Remember, you could be her if you had her
background, knowledge, and experiences. Love her. Really see her, as a person—it’s not just about the
life of the child she may be carrying, it’s about her too. Understand the
difficulties she faces: in her relationships, in her schooling or career, in
her ability to provide basic necessities, etc. Don’t shoot from the hip.
You are dealing with at least two lives here. Set aside your own agenda, and
remember: love, truth, and integrity.

House bill targets same-sex marriage, hits single parenthood

Via the Huffington Post:

In wake of the U.S. Supreme Court decision in favor of same-sex marriage, Republicans are pushing legislation that aims to protect Americans who oppose these unions on religious grounds. But critics say the language is so broad, the bill creates a license to discriminate that would let employers fire women for getting pregnant outside of wedlock.

The First Amendment Defense Act prohibits the federal government from taking discriminatory action against a person — which is defined to include for-profit corporations — acting in accordance with a religious belief that favors so-called traditional marriage. This means the feds can’t revoke a nonprofit’s tax-exempt status or end a company’s federal contract over this issue.

The bill specifically protects those who believe that marriage is between “one man and one woman” or that “sexual relations are properly reserved to such a marriage.” Ian Thompson, a legislative representative at the American Civil Liberties Union, said that in addition to targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, the bill “clearly encompasses discrimination against single mothers” and would hobble the ability of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal body that protects women from sex-based discrimination, to act.

Lauren Nelson of the Friendly Atheist points out that “[e]ven if the GOP can push it through Congress, there’s approximately zero chance that President Obama signs the bill into law.” That’s undoubtedly true, and explains why the story has elicited relatively little reaction apart from the usual Republicans-are-stupid-and-evil commentary.

But Nelson missteps when she suggests that state-level versions of this law are likely to succeed because anti-abortion state laws have succeeded. In fact, the same groups that have pushed hard for state-level pro-life laws are also staunch opponents of pregnancy discrimination.

That became abundantly evident last year, when the Supreme Court heard Young v. UPS. Numerous pro-life organizations petitioned the Supreme Court to rule in favor of strong workplace protections for pregnant mothers. Among them? Americans United for Life and the Susan B. Anthony List, two of the biggest forces for pro-life state legislation.

If opponents of same-sex marriage want to pass anything like the First Amendment Defense Act at the state level, they have two choices: either narrow the language considerably, or go up against the heavyweights of the pro-life movement. And so continues the divorce.

House bill targets same-sex marriage, hits single parenthood

Via the Huffington Post:

In wake of the U.S. Supreme Court decision in favor of same-sex marriage, Republicans are pushing legislation that aims to protect Americans who oppose these unions on religious grounds. But critics say the language is so broad, the bill creates a license to discriminate that would let employers fire women for getting pregnant outside of wedlock.

The First Amendment Defense Act prohibits the federal government from taking discriminatory action against a person — which is defined to include for-profit corporations — acting in accordance with a religious belief that favors so-called traditional marriage. This means the feds can’t revoke a nonprofit’s tax-exempt status or end a company’s federal contract over this issue.

The bill specifically protects those who believe that marriage is between “one man and one woman” or that “sexual relations are properly reserved to such a marriage.” Ian Thompson, a legislative representative at the American Civil Liberties Union, said that in addition to targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, the bill “clearly encompasses discrimination against single mothers” and would hobble the ability of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal body that protects women from sex-based discrimination, to act.

Lauren Nelson of the Friendly Atheist points out that “[e]ven if the GOP can push it through Congress, there’s approximately zero chance that President Obama signs the bill into law.” That’s undoubtedly true, and explains why the story has elicited relatively little reaction apart from the usual Republicans-are-stupid-and-evil commentary.

But Nelson missteps when she suggests that state-level versions of this law are likely to succeed because anti-abortion state laws have succeeded. In fact, the same groups that have pushed hard for state-level pro-life laws are also staunch opponents of pregnancy discrimination.

That became abundantly evident last year, when the Supreme Court heard Young v. UPS. Numerous pro-life organizations petitioned the Supreme Court to rule in favor of strong workplace protections for pregnant mothers. Among them? Americans United for Life and the Susan B. Anthony List, two of the biggest forces for pro-life state legislation.

If opponents of same-sex marriage want to pass anything like the First Amendment Defense Act at the state level, they have two choices: either narrow the language considerably, or go up against the heavyweights of the pro-life movement. And so continues the divorce.